Museum News

News

  • Chinese Museum End-of-year Gathering

    THANK YOU FOR BEING SO AWESOME! All staff, casuals, volunteers, board members are cordially invited to an early end-of-year gathering to celebrate the year’s achievements and events and say a big thank you to everyone before we get too busy! With sincere appreciation forall of your hard work and dedication,the Chinese Museumcordially invites you to an early end-of-year gathering!  Please join us on 9 November 2017 (Thursday) 4 pm-6 pm Food and drinks provided. Please click to RSVP by Sat 4 NovemberOr you can RSVP to marketing@chinesemuseum.com.au We are excited to spend this late afternoon partyCELEBRATING YOU!

  • Exhibition Launch Invitation- Bringing Meaning: Landscapes By Zhou Xiaoping 《另一种呈现:周小平的绘画艺术》开幕仪式

    The Chairman, Mr Bill Au and the Board of the Chinese Museum cordially invite you to the opening of the exhibition. We are pleased to welcome back Zhou Xiaoping to the Chinese Museum for this exhibition. Zhou Xiaoping’s work speaks to the connections of Aboriginal rituals, customs, myths, and to the land where the physical world and the interior and spiritual realms merge. The Chinese Museum would like to acknowledge the generous support of the Chinese International Arts Festival. The exhibition will run until 21 February 2018. *Free event. Click ‘GOING’ or RSVP to marketing@chinesemuseum.com.au for free entry. Time: 6:00 pm Friday, 6 October, 2017 Location: […]

  • Invitation- Celebratory Launch of Chinese Australians 200 years邀请函:《澳洲华人200年百万则故事展》庆祝晚宴

    This is a very important year-long celebration that you can be part of!   2017 and 2018 is a very important time to recognise and uplift the Chinese Community through a year-long celebration created by the Chinese Museum acknowledging two major milestones in our history: In 1818, Mak Sai Ying arrived in Sydney, as the first known Chinese-born settler. In our 200th year anniversary, the Chinese Australian population has reached over one million. We sincerely invite you to join us at the Park Hyatt Melbourne on Tuesday October 17 2017 for a special celebratory funtion – CHINESE AUSTRALIANS 200 YEARS CELEBRATORY LAUNCH.   The […]

  • New Collection Item On Display

    What is this new collection item on display next to our front desk? Donated by Charles Zhang, this shirt was worn during and signed to commemorate the 160th Anniversary Walk from Robe to Melbourne.       In the 1850s-60s, Chinese arrivals had to pay a £10 per head poll tax to land in Victoria. To avoid this, many instead landed in Robe, SA, and walked 500 km to the Victorian Goldfields. The journey was dangerous and not always successful. There have been several recreations of this journey, including walks from Robe to Ballarat in 2013 and 2016.  In May 2017, […]

  • Donors to Mabel Wang Memorial Fund 

    The museum would like to thank you for your strong support of the Mabel Wang Memorial Fund. Your generous donation will go a long way to helping us to establish a Chinese Museum Education Program teaching children about Chinese Dragons. Your support is vital to securing the museum’s role to preserve and promote Chinese culture and history. DONORS TO MABEL WANG MEMORIAL FUND Anita Ho Bill Au Andrew Wang Carole Wilkinson Estella Leung Helene Chung Helen Lau H Martin Julia X.J Renouf Janet Wu John Chen  Les Youie Luisa THE L W Enterprises P/L  M Chu Mak Si Chiu William Program IT  Stephen Chen Sunny Duong  Sally Tuckfield  Trudy Wyse […]

  • Mabel Wang Memorial Fund

    MABEL WANG MEMORIAL FUND   Mabel Wang (nee Chen), 22 July 1924 – 12 May 2017, passed away peacefully at Cabrini Hospital Malvern, Victoria. The Chen family has been an active family in Melbourne’s Chinatown since the 1930s in commerce, community and local politics. With her husband, Councillor David Wang, Mabel was a great contributor to the City of Melbourne in the late 1900s. Mabel was one of the founders of the Melbourne Dai Loong Association and was instrumental in raising funds for the commissioning and purchase of Melbourne Dai Loong (Big Dragon) in 1978, which was the first processional […]

  • Sponsor Story: Central Equity

    The Chinese Museum would like to extend our sincere thanks to Central Equity, our longest serving corporate sponsor, for their generous support through the years. As a multi award winning industry leader in residential properties in Melbourne, this caring Company has actively sponsored a broad range of community organisations and groups over the years, including the Chinese Museum. Central Equity were also kind enough to generously participate in our latest activity by enthusiastically purchasing 4 limited edition Dai Loong dragon scales this year. These original dragon scales are from the 100 metre long Dai Loong or Big Dragon which was the centrepiece of the annual Chinese New Year parade from 1979 – 2000. Owning one of the 500 framed dragon scales represents a rare opportunity to become […]

  • Melbourne International Comedy Festival at the Chinese Museum

      April was an exceptional month for the Chinese Museum. We were proud to partner with the Melbourne International Comedy Festival this year, for the first time, as a key venue for 203 shows. We enthusiastically welcomed 8,000 people to enjoy comedy performances in the unique environment of the Museum. We also gave away free double passes on social media for two Chinese comedy shows to our Museum subscribers. Thanks to the Comedy Festival, the museum was able to welcome many new friends to have their first visit here.   Tim Chan and Vivek Mahbubani, the two award-winning comedians from Hong […]

  • Bringing Meaning: Landscape paintings by Zhou Xiaoping

    Experience the unique collaboration between Chinese and Aboriginal arts. Explore the story behind it on our newest show, Bringing Meaning: Landscape paintings by Zhou Xiaoping, opening in early June.   We are thrilled to launch a brand new exhibition with acclaimed Chinese artist Zhou Xiaoping in early June. Zhou Xiaoping is a Melbourne-based artist, born and educated in China. Since 1988 he has been actively engaged with Aboriginal communities in Arnhem Land and the Kimberley. When he came to Australia in 1988, Xiaoping was deeply attracted to Australian Aboriginal art and culture. He has created a unique artistic style by incorporating his new […]

  • Chinese Anzacs Special Ticket Offer Extended

    Join us in remembering the Chinese Australians who served in World War I. Only until 25 June, we invite you to the Museum. SAVE *$11 : Bring a friend for free (two people for the price of one) Present this on your phone to our ticket desk to qualify. (* Save up to $11 based on full adult price, concessions save $9. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer.)

  • The Chinese Museum’s 2016 holiday gift guide

    It’s that time of the year again! Good for you if you have all your gifts sorted already, you superhuman being — but for the rest of us currently experiencing a pre-holiday headache/total meltdown, the Chinese Museum hopes to help with some of our own nifty gift ideas. Good luck, and shop wisely!   Shao Qihua Paintings ($200) Ideal for: your arty sister She’s both stylish and creative; her wardrobe might consist of only Gorman dresses, which she coordinates with equally colourful lipsticks and her own handmade jewellery. In fact, most days you swear she’s actually the physical manifestation of a Shao Qihua […]

  • ‘Outsider’ Artists: Leo Tien and Shao Qihua

    This summer, the Chinese Museum’s two exhibitions, ‘Modern Folk Art: Peasant Paintings by Shao Qihua’ and ‘The Unruly Art of Leo Tien’, will showcase the paintings of two artists who are not quite artists in the traditional sense. Though wildly different in style, the works of Shao Qihua and Leo Tien might be labelled ‘outsider art’ or ‘naive art’, due to their practices being outside the confinements of the mainstream art world. Often, ‘outsider art’ might also refer to the work of untrained or self-taught artists, which is the case for Leo Tien. Looking only at their ‘outsider’ status, however, overlooks […]

  • Opening night: ‘Unbounded Space’

    Unbounded Space opened on Monday, the 14th of November. The museum was extremely excited to have curator He Fei-Yue and artist Wang Run-Yue on board for this temporary exhibition, not only for their unique brand of contemporary art, but also their expertise in the Chinese arts sector. Both He and Wang are from Shanghai’s celebrated M50 art district, often billed as Beijing 798’s equivalent. While Wang has previously exhibited internationally, Australia is a first for him. The opening drew in a mix of museum members, visitors and local Chinese community members. The Chinese Museum’s chairman Bill Au was also in attendance.  

  • An intern’s illustrations of Melbourne’s Chinese-Australian community

    Back in July/August, the Chinese Museum was fortunate to have Dorrit and Kelly on board as marketing interns. The two students came here from Taiwan as part of a school program, and generously volunteered their time and skills at multiple Chinese-Australian organisations and associations, including the museum. Dorrit has since left Australia, but recently she sent over her own illustrations of her time here in Melbourne – a city she had a blast not only exploring in, but contributing to. These lively images also give us great insight into how our Chinese-Australian community might be viewed through a Chinese lens from […]

  • ‘蝕-nibble, erosion, eclipse’ is extended until 31 October

    We had a few programs on for the Melbourne Fringe Festival this year, but our Contemporary Gallery’s inaugural exhibition 蝕-nibble, erosion, eclipse undeniably stole the show. It not only opened to a sizeable crowd on its opening night, but also had a largely successful run throughout the festival. So much so that it was nominated for the Fringe Visual Art Award. We’re pleased to announce that the show will go on – at least, until October 31. Produced by the Chinese Museum, 蝕 is the result of three artists’ exploration of just one Chinese character – 蝕 (Shí) – and the meanings, feelings […]

  • Opening night: ‘蝕-nibble, erosion, eclipse’

    The museum’s new contemporary art gallery was officially launched on the 15th September, with the help of its inaugural show: 蝕-nibble, erosion, eclipse, helmed by  Zheng Tian-Shu, Chen I-Yen and Yang Yan, three early-career Chinese artists based in Melbourne. As part of the 2016 Melbourne Fringe, the exhibition drew in an unexpectedly big crowd on its opening night. For the past few months, the museum had been busy transforming our level 2 gallery, formerly the ‘Exploratorium’ (a Chinese language education space), into a space dedicated exclusively to contemporary Chinese-Australian arts and culture. It’s hoped that this project can continue the Chinese-Australian dialogue, as well as engendering more diverse narratives within […]

  • Past Moon Festivals at the Chinese Museum

    It might not be as big as Chinese New Year – but it’s certainly no less vibrant. Yes, the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival is here again – the holiday you may associate with the full moon, lanterns and binge-eating mooncakes. While the festival began life as a harvest tradition, today it’s a family-oriented holiday that has everything to do with getting everyone together and eating celebrating. It’s something the Chinese Museum tries to achieve every year, albeit with a refreshing twist each time. This year includes a special workshop for the whole family, as well as a contemporary art exhibition pertaining to a more abstract concept of the […]

  • Meet the artists behind ‘蝕-nibble, erosion, eclipse’

    While we’ve got a few things happening for the 2016 Melbourne Fringe Festival, the most exciting is perhaps 蝕-nibble, erosion, eclipse, a contemporary art exhibition that explores the complex nature of the Chinese character ‘蝕’ (Shi). It’s a symbol connoting loss or disappearance, usually used in relation to a moon eclipse. But it begs the question, do things ever really totally disappear? It’s something 蝕-nibble, erosion, eclipse seeks to answer, through a range of mediums including video, installation and painting – and in doing so, try to push the boundaries between illusion and reality, existence and absence, gain and loss. At the helm are three young Melbourne-based artists […]

  • Moon myths, mooncakes and everything you should know about the Mid-Autumn Festival

    Our Melbourne Fringe programs, the Moon Festival Stories and Crafts Workshop and contemporary art show 蝕-nibble, erosion, eclipse, both concern themes related to the moon. In case you missed it: the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival falls on the 15th of September this year. It won’t be Autumn here in Australia, so you might be asking: what exactly is the ‘Mid-Autumn Festival’? Chances are, you’ll have come across it in some way or another, whether or not you have Chinese heritage. As one of the biggest cultural holidays for ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese, the festival is more than just a celebration of the full moon. […]

  • Our New Favourites from the Museum Gift Shop

    The museum gift shop has had a bit of an overhaul in the last couple of weeks (just in case you missed out on seeing our Museum Director moving things around like an organisation expert). We’re proud to introduce great merchandise for our exhibition Han Dynasty: Life Everlasting, as well as some new book titles too. What we’re reading at the moment: Chineasy, by ShaoLan Hsueh Beginner Chinese learners need to look no further than Chineasy, the hugely successful visual-based Chinese learning system. Combining a simple ‘building block principle’ with quirky illustrations, Chineasy ‘eases’ you in with base characters, which then help form the more […]

  • Chinese New Year Events 2016

                  Happy Year of the Monkey! Come celebrate with us at Chinese Museum! Check out our event calendar below: Chinese Museum Chinese New Year Events Calendar 2016

  • Chung Wah Café Menu (Early 1950s)

    We can recognise on this 1950s menu dishes which remain staples in Chinese restaurants around Australia today. Notice the ‘Chop Suey’: often thought of as an exclusively American-Chinese dish, this menu shows that it was also being served at the Chung Wah Café in Melbourne in the 1950s. There are numerous stories about its origins, the most likely being anthropologist E.N. Anderson’s belief that was based on a Cantonese dish, ‘tsap seui’ (杂碎), meaning ‘miscellaneous leftovers’. The Chung Wah Cafe was located at 11 Heffernan Lane in Melbourne’s Chinatown; a site which in fact housed various Chinese cookshops or restaurants […]

  • Awarded: TripAdvisor ‪‎Certificate of Excellence 2015 Winner

    The Chinese Museum has been awarded 2015’s Certificate of Excellence from TripAdvisor! Thank you to all the voters who left such wonderful reviews, and we hope you will visit us again soon. Find us from Trip Advisor here: Link

  • Chinese ANZACs導覽(英文)

    2014年9月10日 博物館與墨爾本戰爭紀念館攜手,於9月10日下午3點在博物館舉行Chinese ANZACs 的英文導覽活動。此活動免費,但歡迎大家投金幣捐贈。因名額有限,望有意者上墨爾本戰爭紀念館網站預定。