Chinese Anzacs: Chinese Australians and World War One

*Due to popular demand, this exhibition is returning for a limited time.

Level 1, 27 April – 25 May 2017

“If Australia is good enough to live in, it is good enough to fight for.”

– Benjamin Moy Ling (Chinese Anzac)


Special 2 for 1 ticket offer during the exhibition period

Join us for a commemoration to acknowledge and thank the contributions of our Chinese ANZACs in WWI and unfold the dust-laden stories of the many heroic diggers who served on the frontline.

Chinese Australians served valiantly in WWI in many different roles and theatres of war.

The exhibition Chinese ANZACS at the Chinese Museum tells the stories of some of these heroic diggers whose stories have been forgotten or were left untold.

The four Langtip brothers lived in Victoria when they enlisted in 1916.  All four served in the 4th Australian Light Horse Regiment and saw action in many campaigns including the Battle of Beersheba in Oct. 1917.  Remarkably, all were to survive the war.  Richard Wong from Beechworth, Victoria was not so lucky.  His time on active service was short-lived.  A machine gunner, he was killed in 1916 from the injuries he received while fighting at Warlencourt.  One of the best known Chinese Australian soldiers was Billy Sing, who trained with the 5th Australian Light-Horse.   A formidable sniper, he was reported to have shot 200 enemy soldiers.

Chinese Australians found ways to join the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) and the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), despite the Defence Act of 1909, which did not allow those ‘not substantially of European origin’ to enlist for military service.

Although many Chinese Australians were second or third generation Australians and keen to fight, they weren’t always viewed as the ideal recruits but as the war progressed,  the minimum requirements of height and age were relaxed giving many more chances for Chinese Australians to enlist.

While the recruitment policies at the time were racially discriminatory, these and other Chinese Australians were able to serve and won the acceptance and respect of their fellow soldiers.

Chinese ANZACs brings to light the stories of these young men who were willing to sacrifice their lives for the freedoms and privileges they enjoyed as Australians.